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All of us in the John W. Schmidt Center for Student Success want you to be successful this semester. With finals approaching, we wanted to remind you of a few tips to help ensure your success. This information is adapted from a lesson presented within the TROY 1103: College Success Strategies class that is available as a free elective.

Here are five ways to ensure success on your final exams:

  1. Create the best environment for study – make sure that you take noise level, lighting, comfort, and organization into account when choosing the best place to study. While the most comfortable arm-chair on campus might prove to be the best place to take a nap, it might not be the best choice for studying. Also, while multi-tasking might prove useful in other aspects of life, it does not work here. Having your Biology notes open while watching a science-fiction film on Netflix will likely not improve your grade. If you are looking for the best place to study, check out this blog post by Bayleigh Thompson, a senior marketing major from Mobile, AL.
  2. Determine the best time for study – The specific time of day is up to you. Choose a time when you are at your best, when your mind is clear of distractions, and when you have adequate time to devote to the material. You have to carve out this time just like any other appointment. Here’s a hint: make a calendar event on your smartphone and stick to it!
  3. Determine the best length of time for study – Study sessions should have a specific goal and purpose. These sessions should typically last from 30 to 50 minutes. No, not 3 hours! After your study sessions, take a break: go for a walk or some other activity that will get your mind off of the material for a few minutes.
  4. Choose the best study partner – Studying with your significant other will likely prove to be less than ideal. Make sure that you ask each other thought-provoking questions; go beyond the simple answers. Take advantage of each other’s strengths and support each other’s weaknesses. Be aware of too much socializing and remember that we all learn differently!
  5. Assess yourself – The only way to ensure that you are retaining the information is to assess or test yourself. If you can remember it without referencing the material, if you can teach it to others, or if you can explain it in your own words, then you can pass the test.

We wish you all the best!

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IT’S REGISTRATION TIME

Summer 2017 Registration for Troy Campus classes is currently underway! Term 5 2017 Registration for TROY Online will begin May 8th.

Fall 2017 Registration for Troy Campus classes begins on Wednesday, April 12 by classification.

Registration Schedule by classification

April 12th – Senior/Graduate Registration (90+ Hours) 8:00 AM – Noon
April 12th – Junior Registration (60 – 89 hours) 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
April 13th – Sophomore Registration (30 – 59 hours) 8:00 AM – Noon
April 13th – Freshman Registration (0 – 29 hours) 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Registration Tips

  • Prior to registration, have all of your holds removed.
  • For assistance with Student Planning, visit this website.
  • Visit with your advisor prior to the first day of registration. To view the name of your advisor and/or counselor, login to Trojan Web Express, click Students, and click My Profile under Academic Profile. Your advisor and/or counselor will be shown under Academic Information. If you need assistance, call 1-800-414-5756.

Schedule of Classes

 

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The Major Madness Career and Major Exploration Fair is a unique opportunity where students can talk with faculty representing all majors TROY offers. Typically, students must glean this information on an individual departmental basis, so the convenience of having all majors in one location is a can’t miss opportunity.  Although all students can benefit from speaking with professors about careers related to their major at this event, lowerclassmen should particularly use this opportunity to compare career paths and solidify their choice of major.

Major Madness will be held from 2-4 pm on March 29th inside the Trojan Arena. Participants can narrow their options down to a “final four” and declare a major during the event at the Records table.

For more information, contact Career Services at 334-670-3217

– Lauren Cole, coordinator & Emily Reiss, career counselor

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The Conditional Student Program offers students a point of contact who provides encouragement, resources to help students excel in their studies, and guides on study skills, time management, and other topics.

Conditional admission is NOT a bad thing! Don’t overload yourself with tough classes; choose wisely.  Remember, you do NOT have to take Math, English, History, and Science at the same time.

Students must meet with their advisor prior to the registration, each registration, for the duration of their conditional contract. Students admitted conditionally are limited to 13 semester hours and they must enroll in instructional support courses like TROY 1103 or TROY 1102.

To earn unconditional status, students must earn at least a 2.0 institutional grade point average (GPA) on the first 12-24 semester hours attempted. Failure to earn at least a 2.0 institutional GPA within the first 24 hours attempted will result in being dropped from the program. Students dropped from the program may not enroll in Troy University for one calendar year. Any student earning a 0.0 GPA for the initial term/semester with at least 6 hours attempted will be dropped from the program. You might not qualify for financial aid (student loans, grants, scholarships) if you don’t make the grades.

To learn more about the Conditional Student Program, or to contact me, click here

-Jonathan Broyles, counselor

 

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Some students believe that they should know exactly what they want to major in when they arrive at college. However, that is not the case. It takes guidance, research, and overview of different majors to truly decide on the right major. The Undeclared Program offers an abundance of resources to students throughout their first two years of college such as a Major Exploration course, Major Fairs, and job shadowing opportunities to assist  with their decision in choosing a major.

Being an undeclared student can actually be a positive thing. It allows the student to focus more on general studies courses required for graduation, rather than taking courses towards a particular degree that may not be necessary if the student decides to change his or her major.

The Undeclared Program averages between 300-400 undeclared students per semester. We focus on advising each individual student on proper courses to take every semester based on potential majors of interest while providing guidance in the right direction towards a major. We also collaborate with Career Services by providing career self assessments and encourage students to meet with our Career Counselor for additional assistance and support.

We recommend that students who are uncertain about their current majors become undeclared students so that we can keep them on track academically and provide them more guidance towards choosing the right major.

Our next undeclared event, the Major Exploration Fair, will be March 29, 2017, from 2:00-4:00 in the Trojan Arena. This event will give students an opportunity to explore different majors that we offer here at TROY, to speak with faculty and staff within the different departments to get their questions answered and receive more guidance on what each major can offer them. They will be able to talk one-on-one with working professionals who have graduated with various majors to gain insight on the different career paths associated with each major. This event will hopefully allow students to gain clarity on their decision when it comes to choosing a major.

If you have any questions regarding the Undeclared Majors Program or our upcoming events, feel free to contact Rebecca Blankenship, the Undeclared Counselor, at 334-670-3218 or via e-mail at rblankenship@troy.edu. We hope to encourage students to choose majors they are passionate about and assist in achieving their goal of graduating college.

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The Adaptive Needs program at Troy University is committed to providing reasonable and appropriate accommodations to students with physical, emotional and learning disabilities in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

We encourage students with disabilities to reach out to the Adaptive Needs office, disclose their needs, and complete the application process.  The student is responsible for providing the appropriate documentation from the treating physician, which is defined as follows:

  • Clearly stated diagnosis
  • A Copy of any assessments or evaluation instruments used.
  • Current treatment and medication
  • Recommendations

Accommodations are based on diagnosis and need; some examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Extended time to complete tests or in class writing assignments.
  • Quiet testing areas
  • Note taker
  • Scribes or Testing reading
  • Assistance in ordering adaptive equipment
  • Permission to record lectures

Please visit us at 102 Eldridge Hall for more information or you can call us at 334-808-6185 or email us at Alison Hughes, coordinator ajhughes@troy.edu or Jennifer Sewell, disability specialist jsewell46789@troy.edu